What is Physio?

Physiotherapy is concerned with:

Assessing, treating and preventing human movement disorders, restoring normal function or minimising dysfunction and pain in adults and children with physical impairment, to enable them to achieve the highest possible level of independence in their lives; preventing recurring injuries and disability in the workplace, at home, or during recreational activities and promoting community health for all age groups.

Physiotherapists use:

Skilled evaluation, skilled hands-on therapy such as mobilisation, manipulation, massage and acupressure; individually designed exercise programmes, relaxation techniques, sophisticated equipment, hydrotherapy and biofeedback, specialised electrotherapy equipment, heat, ice and traction to relieve pain and assist healing and recovery, suitable walking aids, splints and appliances, patient education.

Where can you work?

One of the wonderful aspects of physiotherapy is the wide choice of work situations which you can enjoy. You may choose to see patients in a particular age range – teaching a young mother in preparation for the birth of her child; handling tiny babies with lung infections or cerebral palsy, coaxing older children (and adults) to move again after surgery, injury or burns. You will learn to analyse and treat the aches and pains of approaching middle age, and in old aged homes, you may help the elderly to retain and regain their independence.

Physiotherapists may work in:

  • Public and private hospitals
  • Private practice
  • Community health centres
  • Daycare centres and nursing homes
  • Sports centres and with sporting teams
  • Schools and pre-schools
  • Research areas
  • Occupational health units
  • Training institutions
  • Health policy development units
  • Special centres for people with physical disabilities

Physiology, Food And Exercise

There are many types of physiotherapy and one new way of treating physiological disorders and conditions is by nutritional changes and treatments. Superfood in particular have become increasingly popular the last couple of years. But it is important to make informed decisions when chosing in the jungle of supplements and nutrients.

Exercise is actually one of the best treatments today, but here, as well as for chosing the right diet, it’s crucial to find what type of physical activity that is best for you, and your condition.

Combining the two, nutrition and exercise is a potent mix, there are several common natural supplement that can be recommended. Mucuna pruriens, or the Velvet bean for example have been shown to increase growth hormone in muscles. Growing tissue in injured joints and muscle is an important part of the healing process, which is why supplements like mucuna, is great for several conditions.

All in all, it is very important that you ask a professional’s advice before starting your recovery, so be sure to question a legitimate physiotherapis before making any desicions about nutrition or exercise.


Slow Food Nation